What suturing techniques and suture material are recommended for use with Neomem® Xac amnion-chorion membranes?

Suturing technique for socket preservation using Neomem® Xac.

There are many different suturing techniques. We cannot recommend one over the other. However, in socket preservation procedures, it seems as if many clinicians seem to prefer a reverse figure eight type of suture technique. The reverse technique refers to the movement of the suture needle from inside the socket to the outside. This aids in membrane retention. In terms of suture material Biotex PTFE (4.0 or 5.0) is mostly used due to the monofilament nature, which eliminates bacterial wicking.

Neomem-Xac-Socket-preservation-illustration-Grafting-Small Neomem-Xac-Socket-preservation-illustration-Membrane-Small Neomem-Xac-Socket-preservation-illustration-Sutures-Small
Following a tooth extraction, fill the socket using bone particulates such as Raptos® Allograft, to prevent bone loss, maintain position of adjacent teeth and allow a healthy bone ridge for future implant support. 

To protect your grafting site, place a dry, untrimmed 12 x 12 mm Neomem® Xac (on any side) over your graft using dry forceps. Neomem® Xac will quickly rehydrate and adhere to the surgical site. Then use a wet membrane placement instrument such as our MPI-1 to hydrate the membrane and tuck the edges as needed. 

Using a PTFE suture such as Biotex™, suture using a reverse figure eight type technique (from inside the socket to outside) to fold down the edges of the soft tissue to better hold in place the membrane and protect the graft. Since PTFE sutures are non resorbable and need to be removed, a longer lasting resorbable monofilament suture, such as Monoglyc™, can be used as an alternative to PTFE sutures.

TIP

Since PTFE sutures are non resorbable and need to be removed, a longer lasting resorbable monofilament suture, such as Monoglyc™, can be used as an alternative to PTFE sutures.